Save the Dates

May 1, 2022

Sex Work Survival Guide Summit

event link/registration

Date: May 1, 2022
Times: 10am-12am EST — recording will be available per perpetuity online
Cost: FREE

May 2, 2022

Webinar: Pending Legislation on Sex Work Decriminalization

The New York County Lawyer’s Association will host a webinar on pending sex work legislation and the movement behind it. Join DSW’s legal director, Melissa Sontag Broudo, and others on May 2 at 6 pm EST for this important session. All are welcome and CLEs are available for attorneys.

For more information and to register, click here.

DSW Newsletter #35 (April 2022)

DSW Testified on Important Sex Work Bills in RI

April 5, 2022 DSW’s legal director, Melissa Broudo, and staff attorney, Rebecca Cleary, traveled to Rhode Island to testify in support of three important bills making their way through the Rhode Island Legislature. As DSW works towards...
Read More
DSW Testified on Important Sex Work Bills in RI

CO Quickly Advances the Safe Reporting Assaults Suffered by Sex Workers Act

April 20, 2022 The Safe Reporting Assaults Suffered by Sex Workers Act, HB22-1288, allows sex workers to come forward to report a crime, access medical or emergency services, or both, if they are in need or witness another...
Read More
CO Quickly Advances the Safe Reporting Assaults Suffered by Sex Workers Act

DSW Report Finds Strong Racial and Gender Biases in Prostitution and Trafficking Enforcement

April 15, 2022 DSW’s new report, “By the Numbers: New York’s Treatment of Sex Workers and Trafficking Survivors,” examined data that had not previously been examined in its totality. Our analysis demonstrates that racial and gender biases...
Read More
DSW Report Finds Strong Racial and Gender Biases in Prostitution and Trafficking Enforcement

Oregon Sex Workers Committee’s Human Rights Commission

April 11, 2022 The Oregon Sex Workers Committee (OSWC) hosted its second Human Rights Commission Hearing. The hearing, held in Eugene, OR, brought together a diverse group of individuals including sex workers, allies, and members of law...
Read More
Oregon Sex Workers Committee’s Human Rights Commission

STI Awareness Month

April 1, 2022 Each April, the American Sexual Health Organization (ASHA) recognizes Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) Awareness Month. Additionally, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recognize STI Awareness Week from April 10-16. According to ASHA:...
Read More
STI Awareness Month

Save the Dates

May 1, 2022 Sex Work Survival Guide Summit event link/registration Date: May 1, 2022 Times: 10am-12am EST — recording will be available per perpetuity online Cost: FREE May 2, 2022 Webinar: Pending Legislation on Sex Work Decriminalization...
Read More
Save the Dates

DSW Newsletter Archive

CO Quickly Advances the Safe Reporting Assaults Suffered by Sex Workers Act

April 20, 2022

The Safe Reporting Assaults Suffered by Sex Workers Act, HB22-1288, allows sex workers to come forward to report a crime, access medical or emergency services, or both, if they are in need or witness another in need of assistance, without fear of arrest for prostitution.

The bill’s lead sponsor, Rep. Brianna Tetote (D), was prompted to pursue and introduce the legislation after learning that her friend, Pasha Eve, had suffered a brutal attack while engaging in sex work. Sex work is not inherently dangerous, but predators leverage the fact that sex workers will often forego reporting crimes for fear of arrest. As Eve recounted to Westword, “He told me, ‘Who are you going to tell? What are you going to do? Because if you call the police, you’ll be arrested.’ He wasn’t wrong. The system is set up so that sex workers are easy prey for predators, and even for human traffickers, who use the crime of sex work as a reason their victims can’t get away. They’ll say, ‘Go to the police and you’ll be arrested,’ and a lot of times, they’re right. It’s not okay that traffickers and abusers are able to use the judicial system against sex workers — and that’s what I told the committee. This is a common-sense bill that says if you’re assaulted, you should be able to go to the police without fear of being arrested yourself.”

The Safe Reporting Assaults Suffered by Sex Workers Act has moved through the CO Legislature at lightning speed. Introduced on March 9, 2022, and unanimously approved by both the House and Senate, it was sent to the Governor’s desk on April 20, 2022. Garnering unanimous, bi-partisan support on almost any issue is rare these days. The overwhelming support for the bill highlights how critical it is to allow sex workers and survivors of human trafficking, who are often arrested even when being exploited, to come forward to seek medical attention and justice. The bill will not only allow for access and equitable treatment in the criminal justice system, it is also good public health policy.

Barring a veto by the Governor, Colorado will become the seventh state to enact this type of legislation, allowing sex workers and surivors of human trafficking to access critical support, should they so choose. Referred to as “Immunity” or “Good Samaritan” laws, these bills are an important incremental step to improving public health and safety on the path to decriminalization of consensual adult work. Utah, Montana, California, Oregon, New Hampshire, and Vermont have all passed this vital legislation. Bills allowing sex workers to seek medical care and to report crimes committed against them or others without fear of arrest, were also introduced in New York, Rhode Island, Nebraska, Hawaii, and Tennessee this year. Unfortunately, these bills have yet to advance in any of these states.

Until each state passes a law similar to Colorado’s, and ultimately, until consensual adult sex work is decriminalized, predators will continue to harm sex workers and survivors of human trafficking with impunity. These laws allow sex workers and trafficked people to safely report crimes and seek medical care without the fear that they themselves will be criminalized and subject to arrest and incarceration. Additionally, they equip law enforcement entities with an increased ability to identify, investigate, and convict perpetrators of violence and trafficking. DSW will continue to advocate for this common sense life-saving measure.

To read more about “Good Samaritan” laws related to sex work and human trafficking, visit our comprehensive fact sheet here.

Rep. Brianna Titone (Courtesy of Brianna Titone)

Rep. Brianna Titone (Courtesy of Brianna Titone)

DSW Newsletter #35 (April 2022)

DSW Testified on Important Sex Work Bills in RI

April 5, 2022 DSW’s legal director, Melissa Broudo, and staff attorney, Rebecca Cleary, traveled to Rhode Island to testify in support of three important bills making their way through the Rhode Island Legislature. As DSW works towards...
Read More
DSW Testified on Important Sex Work Bills in RI

CO Quickly Advances the Safe Reporting Assaults Suffered by Sex Workers Act

April 20, 2022 The Safe Reporting Assaults Suffered by Sex Workers Act, HB22-1288, allows sex workers to come forward to report a crime, access medical or emergency services, or both, if they are in need or witness another...
Read More
CO Quickly Advances the Safe Reporting Assaults Suffered by Sex Workers Act

DSW Report Finds Strong Racial and Gender Biases in Prostitution and Trafficking Enforcement

April 15, 2022 DSW’s new report, “By the Numbers: New York’s Treatment of Sex Workers and Trafficking Survivors,” examined data that had not previously been examined in its totality. Our analysis demonstrates that racial and gender biases...
Read More
DSW Report Finds Strong Racial and Gender Biases in Prostitution and Trafficking Enforcement

Oregon Sex Workers Committee’s Human Rights Commission

April 11, 2022 The Oregon Sex Workers Committee (OSWC) hosted its second Human Rights Commission Hearing. The hearing, held in Eugene, OR, brought together a diverse group of individuals including sex workers, allies, and members of law...
Read More
Oregon Sex Workers Committee’s Human Rights Commission

STI Awareness Month

April 1, 2022 Each April, the American Sexual Health Organization (ASHA) recognizes Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) Awareness Month. Additionally, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recognize STI Awareness Week from April 10-16. According to ASHA:...
Read More
STI Awareness Month

Save the Dates

May 1, 2022 Sex Work Survival Guide Summit event link/registration Date: May 1, 2022 Times: 10am-12am EST — recording will be available per perpetuity online Cost: FREE May 2, 2022 Webinar: Pending Legislation on Sex Work Decriminalization...
Read More
Save the Dates

DSW Newsletter Archive

DSW Report Finds Strong Racial and Gender Biases in Prostitution and Trafficking Enforcement

April 15, 2022

DSW’s new report, “By the Numbers: New York’s Treatment of Sex Workers and Trafficking Survivors,” examined data that had not previously been examined in its totality. Our analysis demonstrates that racial and gender biases are as strong as ever and that the most damaging impacts of criminalization are suffered by communities with the greatest vulnerabilities. Frances Steele, research and policy coordinator and lead author of the report, submitted a commentary summarizing the report’s findings to The Crime Report. Read it here.

DSW Research and Policy Coordinator Frances Steele.

DSW Research and Policy Coordinator Frances Steele.

DSW Newsletter #35 (April 2022)

DSW Testified on Important Sex Work Bills in RI

April 5, 2022 DSW’s legal director, Melissa Broudo, and staff attorney, Rebecca Cleary, traveled to Rhode Island to testify in support of three important bills making their way through the Rhode Island Legislature. As DSW works towards...
Read More
DSW Testified on Important Sex Work Bills in RI

CO Quickly Advances the Safe Reporting Assaults Suffered by Sex Workers Act

April 20, 2022 The Safe Reporting Assaults Suffered by Sex Workers Act, HB22-1288, allows sex workers to come forward to report a crime, access medical or emergency services, or both, if they are in need or witness another...
Read More
CO Quickly Advances the Safe Reporting Assaults Suffered by Sex Workers Act

DSW Report Finds Strong Racial and Gender Biases in Prostitution and Trafficking Enforcement

April 15, 2022 DSW’s new report, “By the Numbers: New York’s Treatment of Sex Workers and Trafficking Survivors,” examined data that had not previously been examined in its totality. Our analysis demonstrates that racial and gender biases...
Read More
DSW Report Finds Strong Racial and Gender Biases in Prostitution and Trafficking Enforcement

Oregon Sex Workers Committee’s Human Rights Commission

April 11, 2022 The Oregon Sex Workers Committee (OSWC) hosted its second Human Rights Commission Hearing. The hearing, held in Eugene, OR, brought together a diverse group of individuals including sex workers, allies, and members of law...
Read More
Oregon Sex Workers Committee’s Human Rights Commission

STI Awareness Month

April 1, 2022 Each April, the American Sexual Health Organization (ASHA) recognizes Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) Awareness Month. Additionally, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recognize STI Awareness Week from April 10-16. According to ASHA:...
Read More
STI Awareness Month

Save the Dates

May 1, 2022 Sex Work Survival Guide Summit event link/registration Date: May 1, 2022 Times: 10am-12am EST — recording will be available per perpetuity online Cost: FREE May 2, 2022 Webinar: Pending Legislation on Sex Work Decriminalization...
Read More
Save the Dates

DSW Newsletter Archive

Oregon Sex Workers Committee’s Human Rights Commission

April 11, 2022

The Oregon Sex Workers Committee (OSWC) hosted its second Human Rights Commission Hearing. The hearing, held in Eugene, OR, brought together a diverse group of individuals including sex workers, allies, and members of law enforcement, who testified regarding the numerous and critical reasons to decriminalize consensual adult sex work.

Current and former sex workers described the devastating consequences that contact with the criminal justice system has had on their lives and their family members. Amber Batts, who turned to sex work to support herself and her children after escaping an abusive relationship, testified that after she was arrested her children were forced to live with their abusive father.

Because sex work is criminalized and misunderstood, consensual adult prostitution is often conflated with human trafficking in laws and policy reponses. Batts, from Alaska, was charged with trafficking, though Alaska’s vague law lacks the federal guidelines of force, fraud, or coercion, which define trafficking. The law, in essence, conflates human trafficking and consensual adult sex work. She testified that her bail conditions were more stringent than someone charged with murder. She was sentenced to five and a half years in prison for a “crime” in which no one was hurt. On the day of her sentencing, a woman who killed another individual was sentenced to three years.

Batts never intended to be public about her engagement in sex work, she was outed and malinged in the media following her arrest. Prior to her arrest and time in prison, Batts owned a home and was able to support herself and her children on her own. After her release, she was not able to obtain employment in the social services, for which her college education had prepared her, or in any field that would provide benefits or sufficient compensation. Sex work had allowed her to be independent.

J. Leigh Oshiro-Brantly, research and project manager at DSW, as well as a sex worker and long-time sex work activist, testified about the harms of the Entrapment/Nordic/End Demand/Equality model. They spoke powerfully about keeping moral and ideological frameworks out of decisions around public policy, and reminded viewers that decriminalization is the only legal framework governing sex work that gives agency to the worker.

The hearing also included an interview with a former high-ranking member of law enforcement in New Zealand. He discussed how and why the 2003 Prostitution Reform Act (PRA), which decriminalized sex work in New Zealand, led to an increase in public health and safety and a decrease in exploitation. Watch the informative and enlightening video here.

We encourage you to to watch the full Human Rights Commission Hearing here.

J. Leigh Oshiro-Brantly testifies during the commission hearing.

J. Leigh Oshiro-Brantly testifies during the commission hearing.

DSW Newsletter #35 (April 2022)

DSW Testified on Important Sex Work Bills in RI

April 5, 2022 DSW’s legal director, Melissa Broudo, and staff attorney, Rebecca Cleary, traveled to Rhode Island to testify in support of three important bills making their way through the Rhode Island Legislature. As DSW works towards...
Read More
DSW Testified on Important Sex Work Bills in RI

CO Quickly Advances the Safe Reporting Assaults Suffered by Sex Workers Act

April 20, 2022 The Safe Reporting Assaults Suffered by Sex Workers Act, HB22-1288, allows sex workers to come forward to report a crime, access medical or emergency services, or both, if they are in need or witness another...
Read More
CO Quickly Advances the Safe Reporting Assaults Suffered by Sex Workers Act

DSW Report Finds Strong Racial and Gender Biases in Prostitution and Trafficking Enforcement

April 15, 2022 DSW’s new report, “By the Numbers: New York’s Treatment of Sex Workers and Trafficking Survivors,” examined data that had not previously been examined in its totality. Our analysis demonstrates that racial and gender biases...
Read More
DSW Report Finds Strong Racial and Gender Biases in Prostitution and Trafficking Enforcement

Oregon Sex Workers Committee’s Human Rights Commission

April 11, 2022 The Oregon Sex Workers Committee (OSWC) hosted its second Human Rights Commission Hearing. The hearing, held in Eugene, OR, brought together a diverse group of individuals including sex workers, allies, and members of law...
Read More
Oregon Sex Workers Committee’s Human Rights Commission

STI Awareness Month

April 1, 2022 Each April, the American Sexual Health Organization (ASHA) recognizes Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) Awareness Month. Additionally, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recognize STI Awareness Week from April 10-16. According to ASHA:...
Read More
STI Awareness Month

Save the Dates

May 1, 2022 Sex Work Survival Guide Summit event link/registration Date: May 1, 2022 Times: 10am-12am EST — recording will be available per perpetuity online Cost: FREE May 2, 2022 Webinar: Pending Legislation on Sex Work Decriminalization...
Read More
Save the Dates

DSW Newsletter Archive

DSW Testified on Important Sex Work Bills in RI

April 5, 2022

DSW’s legal director, Melissa Broudo, and staff attorney, Rebecca Cleary, traveled to Rhode Island to testify in support of three important bills making their way through the Rhode Island Legislature. As DSW works towards our ultimate goal of the decriminalization of consensual adult sex work, we are advocating for incremental measures that will reduce exploitation and violence perpetrated against sex workers and survivors of trafficking. If passed, the three bills introduced in RI, which Broudo and Cleary testified in support of, would bring immediate health and safety benefits to individuals engaged in sex work.

H7704, currently being reviewed by the House Judiciary Committee, grants immunity from prosecution for commercial sexual activity to any victim or witness of a crime if they report the offense to law enforcement, seek or receive health care services as a result of their involvement or witnessing the offense, or assist or attempt to assist in the investigation and prosecution of the offense. Importantly, this protection is honored even if they later withdraw their cooperation.

People involved in the sex trade (whether by choice or by force, fraud, or coercion) are often victims of violent crime and exploitation, but frequently don’t report crimes perpetrated against them due to fear of arrest. When abusers are not reported to law enforcement, they are able to continue acts of violence and exploitation with impunity. Immunity laws allow sex workers and trafficked people to safely report crimes and seek medical care without the fear that they themselves will be criminalized. They equip law enforcement entities with an increased ability to identify, investigate, and convict perpetrators of violence and trafficking. Immunity laws directly protect victims and witnesses of violence and they ultimately benefit all communities by allowing law enforcement to better detect criminal activity.

H6637 / S2233, in committee, establishes criteria for the criminal offense of sexual assault when the victim is in the custody of a peace officer. It provides that a person convicted of custodial sexual assault would face imprisonment for not more than three years. Forty states have laws making sexual interaction between a law enforcement agent and a person in their custody illegal.

As Broudo wrote, “Most people cannot believe police are permitted to do this. The reality is that they should not, but that they do, on quite a regular basis. Sex workers and those profiled as sex workers — especially transgender women of color — are subject to routine sexual assault by police offering ‘deals’ (‘if you do this, I will not arrest you now’). This is not consent — in fact, it is the very definition of coercion. Other states, including Nevada and Pennsylvania, are currently considering similar laws to punish custodial sexual assault. To say there is a power imbalance between law enforcement and those in their custody would be a severe understatement — people who are in custody have no agency, have fear about what is to come, and are at the complete and total mercy of those who have taken them into custody. There cannot possibly be a consensual sexual encounter between someone in custody and the person in charge of their freedom. When you think of who may be in custody, there is a disproportionate chance that person will be part of a marginalized or more vulnerable group [people of color, specifically Black and Brown people, are significantly more likely to be arrested]. When it comes to sex work, Black and Brown women, especially transgender women, are the most likely to be arrested - and also the most vulnerable to exploitation, abuse, and stigma. These factors are easily exploited by law enforcement.”

H7672, currently in committee, mandates a patient shall “be afforded respectful, considerate care” not be be discriminated against on any basis including age, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, or income source or profession.

Healthcare access is critical for the rights and safety of all. This is especially true when it comes to sex workers who face increased risk of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), sexual assault, and physical assault as a result of the criminalization of their work. Many sex workers do not seek critical healthcare because they have faced discrimination, or reporting to law enforecement  by medical professionals. Protection against discrimination in seeking care is not only life-saving, it’s an important step in protecting against the spread of STIs, and increasing resource access for some of our most underserved community members.

Further, healthcare providers serve a critical role in identifying and helping to report (with the patient’s permission) instances of human trafficking. Unfortunately, because of the criminalization of commericial sex, individuals trafficked for the purpose of selling sex are afraid to seek services. This is not only a violation of human rights, it is a public health and safety concern. We must make safe, confidential, and appropriate healthcare resources available to all individuals.

Rebecca Cleary testifies in front of the RI House Judiciary Committee.

Rebecca Cleary testifies in front of the RI House Judiciary Committee.

Melissa Broudo testifies in front of the RI House Judiciary Committee.

Melissa Broudo testifies in front of the RI House Judiciary Committee.

DSW Newsletter #35 (April 2022)

DSW Testified on Important Sex Work Bills in RI

April 5, 2022 DSW’s legal director, Melissa Broudo, and staff attorney, Rebecca Cleary, traveled to Rhode Island to testify in support of three important bills making their way through the Rhode Island Legislature. As DSW works towards...
Read More
DSW Testified on Important Sex Work Bills in RI

CO Quickly Advances the Safe Reporting Assaults Suffered by Sex Workers Act

April 20, 2022 The Safe Reporting Assaults Suffered by Sex Workers Act, HB22-1288, allows sex workers to come forward to report a crime, access medical or emergency services, or both, if they are in need or witness another...
Read More
CO Quickly Advances the Safe Reporting Assaults Suffered by Sex Workers Act

DSW Report Finds Strong Racial and Gender Biases in Prostitution and Trafficking Enforcement

April 15, 2022 DSW’s new report, “By the Numbers: New York’s Treatment of Sex Workers and Trafficking Survivors,” examined data that had not previously been examined in its totality. Our analysis demonstrates that racial and gender biases...
Read More
DSW Report Finds Strong Racial and Gender Biases in Prostitution and Trafficking Enforcement

Oregon Sex Workers Committee’s Human Rights Commission

April 11, 2022 The Oregon Sex Workers Committee (OSWC) hosted its second Human Rights Commission Hearing. The hearing, held in Eugene, OR, brought together a diverse group of individuals including sex workers, allies, and members of law...
Read More
Oregon Sex Workers Committee’s Human Rights Commission

STI Awareness Month

April 1, 2022 Each April, the American Sexual Health Organization (ASHA) recognizes Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) Awareness Month. Additionally, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recognize STI Awareness Week from April 10-16. According to ASHA:...
Read More
STI Awareness Month

Save the Dates

May 1, 2022 Sex Work Survival Guide Summit event link/registration Date: May 1, 2022 Times: 10am-12am EST — recording will be available per perpetuity online Cost: FREE May 2, 2022 Webinar: Pending Legislation on Sex Work Decriminalization...
Read More
Save the Dates

DSW Newsletter Archive

STI Awareness Month

April 1, 2022

Each April, the American Sexual Health Organization (ASHA) recognizes Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) Awareness Month. Additionally, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recognize STI Awareness Week from April 10-16.

According to ASHA:
• There are 20 million new STI cases in the U.S. every year;
• The medical costs for these new cases are $16 billion;
• Adding the new cases each year with existing infection, there are an estimated 110 million total STIs among Americans.

Numerous public health agencies, including the World Health Organization, UNAIDS, the Global Commission on HIV and the Law, support the decriminalization of sex work as an essential step in the global fight against HIV, AIDS, and other STIs. Research shows the decriminalization of sex work would reduce HIV transmissions by 33-46% worldwide. Where sex work is criminalized, sex workers have less agency and are more likely to engage in risky behaviors such as having unprotected sex.

Criminalization and policing practices greatly impede sex workers’ ability to protect themselves and their clients from STI transmission. The possession of condoms is often used by law enforcement as evidence that an individual has the intent to engage in or has engaged in prositution. According to the ACLU, “Research indicates that certain police practices related to enforcement of sex work criminalization may put sex workers (and their clients) at greater health risk. Interviews with sex workers in Sacramento Valley, California revealed that the threat and incidence of detention increased if sex workers had condoms in their possession. Some sex workers in a New York City study reported that police confiscated or destroyed their condoms, even outside the context of arrests. A number of these workers stated they carry fewer condoms due to their fear of arrest, but several indicated that this did not deter them from their commitment to practicing safer sex.”

In addition to criminalization, the stigma associated with sex work can make it difficult for sex workers to obtain adequate sexual and reproductive health services. Sex workers often face discrimination by medical health professionals who may choose to condemn them for their choice to engage in sex work instead of simply providing them with the medical care they seek. Both the CDC and ASHA recommend regular testing for STIs as the most important measure to both treat and prevent STIs as many have no symptoms.

The United Nations Reproductive Health and Rights Agency (UNFPA) found that nearly 1 in 4 sex workers have been denied health care because of their occupation. It is imperative that sex workers are able to seek regular testing and routine care without worrying about being shamed or, worse, denied services for how they earn their income.

DSW is advocating in Rhode Island for the passage of H7672, currently in committee,  which mandates that a patient shall “be afforded respectful, considerate care” not be be discriminate against on any basis including age, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, or income source or profession. This would ensure respectful access to all medical care for all workers.

Courtesy of AIDS Healthcare Foundation (2019).

DSW Newsletter #35 (April 2022)

DSW Testified on Important Sex Work Bills in RI

April 5, 2022 DSW’s legal director, Melissa Broudo, and staff attorney, Rebecca Cleary, traveled to Rhode Island to testify in support of three important bills making their way through the Rhode Island Legislature. As DSW works towards...
Read More
DSW Testified on Important Sex Work Bills in RI

CO Quickly Advances the Safe Reporting Assaults Suffered by Sex Workers Act

April 20, 2022 The Safe Reporting Assaults Suffered by Sex Workers Act, HB22-1288, allows sex workers to come forward to report a crime, access medical or emergency services, or both, if they are in need or witness another...
Read More
CO Quickly Advances the Safe Reporting Assaults Suffered by Sex Workers Act

DSW Report Finds Strong Racial and Gender Biases in Prostitution and Trafficking Enforcement

April 15, 2022 DSW’s new report, “By the Numbers: New York’s Treatment of Sex Workers and Trafficking Survivors,” examined data that had not previously been examined in its totality. Our analysis demonstrates that racial and gender biases...
Read More
DSW Report Finds Strong Racial and Gender Biases in Prostitution and Trafficking Enforcement

Oregon Sex Workers Committee’s Human Rights Commission

April 11, 2022 The Oregon Sex Workers Committee (OSWC) hosted its second Human Rights Commission Hearing. The hearing, held in Eugene, OR, brought together a diverse group of individuals including sex workers, allies, and members of law...
Read More
Oregon Sex Workers Committee’s Human Rights Commission

STI Awareness Month

April 1, 2022 Each April, the American Sexual Health Organization (ASHA) recognizes Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) Awareness Month. Additionally, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recognize STI Awareness Week from April 10-16. According to ASHA:...
Read More
STI Awareness Month

Save the Dates

May 1, 2022 Sex Work Survival Guide Summit event link/registration Date: May 1, 2022 Times: 10am-12am EST — recording will be available per perpetuity online Cost: FREE May 2, 2022 Webinar: Pending Legislation on Sex Work Decriminalization...
Read More
Save the Dates

DSW Newsletter Archive